Shooting Film: Fomapan 400 and the Fish Eye Mamiya-Sekor C 37mm f/4.5

My primary medium format workhorse is the Mamiya RB67 Pro-S. Because I'm so happy with the camera I nearly have all available lenses and so (since last week) also this one: The Fish Eye Mamiya-Sekor C.


The first impression was that it's a heavy bastard of a lens. Please don't misunderstand me there are way more heavier lenses out there, but compared to the other Sekors I have you feel the weight of the glass. Since the shape of the front glass filters have to be placed on the rear side of the lens. For construction reasons there always need to be one filter attached.


For the following pictures I used a Y48 filter and a Fomapan 400 film.


The weather condition was hazy so all subjects were gray in gray with no contrast.

Even if I know that people are telling you that the Fomapan is a very flat film with no characteristics for pushing and a real ISO of 320 I wanted to try it for myself. The most of them complain about the grain and detail loss in the shadows. Who cares?!


I was shooting with an ISO 800 setting and a Yellow Filter 48. The filter has no impact to the exposure so there was no need to pay attention to this. Anyway I developed the first time in SPUR Acurol-N with a dilution of 1:35 and a total developing time of 20 min.


Beside that the expected result would be nothing special I was pretty impressed about how this shots turned out when I opened the tank.

Especially the grain does not over overwhelm you. Beside the lens is sharp and make really good pictures. ​


Summary: If you neve tried any Fish Eye lens than you missed something. It's just impressing how close you can get to subjects and they are still completely in frame. People love it or hate it. It's the same like with everything. Test it for yourself and have to experiment with it. Spoiler Alert: in one of the next entrys, I will show how simple and cheap it is to get started in medium format film photography. Stay tuned

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