Street Photography - Shooting In Bratislava

Because there is no real definition what counts to the genre street photography I have my own. I'd say it's the real life, with real situations and sujets. Not always there have to be people included in the picture, sometimes it's just about the cityscape or how things are related to each other. That could be a very ordinary thing like a famous landmark seen in an different angle.


I'm a big fan of unusal and untypical or I even would say grimy and extraordinary objects. If it's a broken car in a special surrounding or a dirty wall with some nice structure. Those are eyecatchers for me. If I see something while walking around I immediately start to imagine how it came to this situation or how it was before, maybe 5 years or 50 years ago or even yesterday. That is what is important to me.


Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 250mm shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N



Of course do people also play a big role. Not that there are a lot of fellas living in a city, but more because that everybody is unique with his appearance and character.

Situations including people do automatically trigger emotions or feelings to the viewer. That depends if it's a portrait which fills completely the frame or if it shows the person related to something. That can be their surrounding or something simple like their pet. In street photography I concentrate to include people into their natural environment to tell a story about them and the circumstances they are living.


Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 250mm shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N



So street photography has more facets than you may think. The boarders between documentary and art are running into one another. So it's possible to document something on the one hand but also to give it an artistic note on the other. This weekend I was in Bratislava and I took a couple of shots in the city. We do all know that Slovakia was part of the iron curtain but is now more than 14 years member of the European Union. Because of this you have a great contrast of the modern infrastructure and the strict communist one.


Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 127mm, shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N



Just by walking around you find a lot of inspirations and motifs which are worth to capture. Not only in Bratislava. Everywhere! Shoot things which seem to be nothing special in first place but give them with your own interpretation a new soul so they become something special. You know exactly how the sitauation was or where it was but the viewer of your picture may not. So you can try to control and guide him what he needs to see or where in the image is the focus respectively what is the main content. You can do it in different ways for example with light and shadows or contrast. Also geometric formations or lines are a way.

Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 127mm, shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N

Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 50mm, shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N


As I mentioned in the beginning of this entry, there are no rules that some sujets count to street photography and others do not. So even if someone is telling you that some pictures do not fit directly to the term "street photography" I need to disagree. For me everything that happens on or around the street does work with this genre. So globaly spoken I call everything I photograph in a city "street photography".


Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, 127mm, shot on Kodak T-Max 400 @320, developed in Spur Acurol-N


Summary: Grab your camera, go out and take some pictures in your city. Even if you are not familiar with this kind of genre try it out. It will open your point of view for other things. And remember:


"Shoot things which seem to be nothing special in first place but give them with your own interpretation a new soul so they become something special."




Recent Posts

Stay Up-To-Date with New Posts

Search By Tags